Bath Wilts aviator, continues his odyssey of spectacular UK Autumn/Winter Soaring sites 😎.

Good evening fellow aviators.

Continuing my tour of spectacular UK Autumn/Winter Soaring sites, I visited “Derbyshire and Lancashire Gliding Club” at the weekend.

DLGC is a hill-top Gliding site nestled in the heart of the Peak District National Park. The airfield sits 1350ft above sea level with soarable ridges flanking its Western and Southern edges. Locally there are three more soarable ridges. To the North is Win Hill ridge, and Mam Tor ridge. To the East is the Froggatt Edge/Hathersage ridge. The wealth of available local ridges, combined with local wave effects, creates soarable conditions throughout the year, dependant on suitable weather conditions of course.

As it was my first time visiting here, I have taken a few pictures below to share with you all. Hope you enjoy them 🙂.

Being situated in a National Park, means even the views at ground level are special.

The airfield is generously proportioned, with take off and landings possible in Northerly, Southerly, and Westerly directions, dependant on wind direction.

The launch point is run a little differently here than at Bath Wilts. They run two Winch lines parallel to each other at DLGC.

Fear not dear club members, no need to put down your evening glass of gin & tonic, you are not seeing double 😉! The winch area is run a little differently here than at Bath Wilts. At DLGC they set up two winches side by side, and run the two cables from each winch to the launch point.

The cable retrieve land rovers are modified with extendable cable mounts so that they can tow 4 cables at a time to the launch point, this enables more Gliders to be launched per cable retrieve.

Fear not dear aviators, you may continue to sip your evening cocktail, you are not seeing triple 😉! This trio of hardy machines are the Glider retrieve vehicles used at DLGC.

This was my trusty steed during my visit 🙂.

This was the view from the cockpit while I was readying for launch on the Southern edge of the airfield. The port wing was resting on the ground when I took this picture, but I think you can still get a real sense of some of the undulating terrain of the airfield from this shot. The undulations of the airfield surface, and the spectacular terrain of the Peak District surroundings give this site an enticingly adventurous feel.

The moment you release from the winch and reach level flight, the beauty of the National Park surroundings washes over you.

The first few seconds of flight here are quite intense, as the view appears to become more and more beautiful as you survey the panorama.

It’s an emotional experience, and one I thoroughly recommend.

The waterway you can see in the picture above is Ladybower reservoir. The Derwent Dam, which separates Ladybower reservoir from the Derwent reservoir, was used for bombing raid training during the Second World War by the famous “Dambuster” Lancaster Bomber crews, in preparation for raids on strategic German targets. During training, the Lancaster crews would approach Derwent Dam just 60ft above the water of the Derwent reservoir! The Dambuster crews were said to have been specially selected for their prowess and ‘press on spirit’.

As you can see in the picture above, the fields surrounding DLGC are plentiful and generally not used for crops. This gives gives good ‘land-out’ options for Glider pilots. One weekend every year DLGC gives pilots the opportunity for real ‘land-out’ practice with one of their instructors in a local field.

An interesting facility at the DLGC is their Gliding Simulator. The two seater fuselage you can see above was converted from a Janus two seater trainer.

The simulator runs Condor 2 software, and utilises a three projector screen display system.

The simulator can be used for a wide variety of Gilding training including launching, circuits, soaring, and aerobatics. I spent a fascinating few hours with the simulator and club instructor Dave M.

Dave very kindly sent me a link to the BGA forum for Simulator use, as well as a report on Simulators by the Gliding Federation of Australia, and a handbook on Sim training produced by the French Gliding Federation. I would be very happy to share these with any club member who also has an interest in Gliding Simulators.

All in all dear aviators, I had a terrific time at DLGC 🙂.

Many thanks to all I met at DLGC. A special thank you to Andy W, Sylvie and John, for settling me in over the weekend and making me feel so welcome. A special thank you also to club instructors Dave M, Bryan A, and Chris R, for sharing with me their wealth of technical and local soaring knowledge 🙂.

If you visit a Gliding Club that sits on a hill-top, 1350ft above sea level, in the Peak District, in autumn, you will likely need to wrap up warm, but I promise you it will be worth it 😉.

Where should I visit next I wonder dear aviators….

This Bath Wilts aviators odyssey of spectacular UK Autumn/Winter Soaring sites continues 😎….

kind regards.

Damien.

Bath Wilts aviator spreads his wings 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿 🙂.

Good evening fellow aviators.

I have taken a trip to the Scottish Gliding Centre this weekend to try and extend my Gliding season a little more.

It is my first time visiting here, so I have taken a few pictures below to share with you all. Hope you enjoy them 🙂.

The forecast predicted a 15 knot 240 degree wind, so I knew the ridge to the north of the club should be working.

I woke early to survey the ridge I would be flying.

The launch point is run a little differently here than at Bath Wilts. They run two Winch lines parallel to each other. With each line taking one of the two winch cables when they are retrieved.

The club tug plane is a neat little Euro Fox model.

The club weather vane and windsock is worthy of a quick photo too 🙂.

There was a large variety of private Gliders at the club, but there was one in particular I thought the longer serving members of Bath Wilts might enjoy seeing a picture of….

I chose winch launches today, as my objective was working the north ridge, which is comfortably in reach from winch height. A club K21 was my trusty stead for the day, and arguably has one of the best tail numbers I’ve seen 🙂.

The views are spectacular from the moment you release from the winch.

The club is located alongside Loch Leven. Housed on a small island in the Loch is Loch Leven Castle, and on the edge of the Loch is Kinross House. Both structures can be seen surprisingly clearly from the air.

The ridge I was flying today forms part of the Lomond Hills Regional Park. Its a great feeling flying so close to such an impressive geological feature. The detail you get to see in the landscape from this vantage point is truly beautiful.

The ridge itself works with surprising ease and predictability. With todays weather conditions, the ridge reliably generated between 2 – 6kts up all day, with the ridge effect topping out between 2000ft – 2600ft depending on wind strength.

As you crest the top of the ridge, the views keep getting better and better  🙂.

To help lend a sense of scale for those that haven’t visited here before. The waterway you can see on the image below is Ballo reservoir, situated on top of the ridge!  🙂.

This Gliding site is truly, truly, beautiful.

What a great day dear aviators.

What centre of Gliding majesty should I visit next I wonder….

….Aboyne perhaps?

Hmm…. I’m certainly tempted by tales of wave, and tremendous height gains.

Yes dear aviators, its time I think to start planning my first trip to Aboyne 🙂.

Kind regards.

Damien.

Thursday 29th August. “Refreshingly Cool 😎”.

Good evening fellow aviators.

After some very warm days this week already, today at the park was a very pleasant and clement 18 degrees celcius. The wind varying between 230 – 250 degrees, 10 – 15 knot ground wind, 20 knot flying wind. This made for respectable launch heights, and some very welcome assistance in staying aloft from our local ridge.

The forecast was a respectable one for local soaring, and although not a stellar day for soaring, extended flights were enjoyed throughout the day.

There was only a small scattering of aviators at the Park today, but fortunately Barts dog ‘Google’ was available to lend a “paw” at the launch point.

Until retiring to her “lunch” point after a busy mornings work 🐶🦴🙂.

The skies to the South West of the Park reverberated to the sounds of multiple military fast jets and helicopters performing “high energy training manoeuvres”.

Merv and Gordon were so inspired by the days soaring opportunities, that in the absence of a spare Glider began experimenting with alternative methods for achieving a quick solo flight 😂🙂.

A total of 27 Glider flights today. First launch at 11:05, last landing at 17:50.

A refreshingly cool and enjoyable day at the Park dear aviators.

Kind regards.

Damien.

Wednesday 21st August. “Terrific local soaring, but more challenging for Cross Country”.

Good evening fellow aviators.

It was a good forecast for today, and there was some terrific local soaring from very early in the day, right through to the very last flight of the day.

By the time the Gliders and launch point were prepared and ready, the sky was already showing promise.

2 Club Puchacz, all the club single seaters, and an array of private gliders lined up at the launch point, with up to a dozen online at a time. No pictures of this unfortunately as I was in the launch point line getting ready to fly with everyone else 🙂.

Locally soaring opportunities were plentiful, but the Cross Country guys reported conditions were more challenging out on task, with weak lift and cloud bases as low as 2000ft at times. Mark H fared better than most however, and managed to strike out to Northampton and complete a 250k task.

Former club members Steve & Kath Grzeskowiak made a welcome visit to the Park today. They have travelled back from Australia on a whistle stop tour visiting family and friends in the UK. Steve took to the skies around the park once again this afternoon with Stuart N in the Motor Glider. Taking the controls for all but the take off and landing, on a 1:20 flight, Steve managed a respectable engine off Glide time of approx 40 mins during the flight.

41 Glider flights today, 1 Motor Glider flight, plus an aero tow home for a visiting Dorset Gliding Club member Richard, who landed at the Park after completing a 50k.

First launch 10:43, final club glider landed at 18:04.

Another great day at the Park dear aviators 🙂.

Kind regards.

Damien.

Tuesday 20th August. “Good soaring day 🙂”.

Good evening fellow aviators.

A good forecast preceded a good days soaring from the Park  today.

A steady 10 -15 kt WNW wind was present throughout the day, but glorious sunshine persisted and the temperatures remained warm and comfortable all day.

The Cross Country Pilots were out in force, tackling a variety of tasks, and travelling as far and wide as Bridgnorth and Milton Keynes. Alastair encountered one particular thermal that averaged 11.5kts up during a 1000ft climb!

Mike J, was kept busy locally with training duties, and even tried his hand at a bit of inflight photography. Please see picture below dear aviators 😂🙂!Good first attempt Mike 😂🙂. 

The launch point took a momentary step back in time at one point this afternoon, with a trio of K6’s on line ready to launch 🙂.

32 Glider flights in total today. Plus a welcome visit from a Mendip motor glider.

Tomorrows forecast looks promising again fellow aviators 🙂👍.

Kind regards.

Damien.

Monday 19th August. “Soaring between the showers”.

Good evening fellow aviators.

After consulting with the oracle (RASP 😉), we knew today wouldn’t be a strong soaring day, but sometimes its just nice to get off the ground, even for just a few minutes. For those pilots wanting instruction, Mike J was on hand, and was kept busy all day training.

Showers were frequent but short throughout the day, and we were generally managing two launches then parking the Gliders for 10 minutes to let a shower pass through, before wiping the gliders dry and launching again. The enthusiasm to fly remained undiminished throughout the day, with every opportunity to launch being grasped.

At ground level a steady 10 – 15 knot westerly wind, occasionally gusted to 20 knots. The wind was very slightly warm, and brilliant sunshine was there to be enjoyed between showers. The flying wind up to 20 knots westerly.

Conditions delivered excellent launch heights, giving pilots the opportunity to make the most of the limited lift to be found. The Puchacz launching between 1500 – 1600 ft, the Astir 1700 – 1800ft.

Merv B re-solo’d today 🙂. Merv returned to gliding last year, after 15 years away from the sport. He took to the skies this afternoon, once again a solo pilot. Well done Merv 👍🙂.

16 Glider Flights in total today. A very productive instructional day, and a very pleasant days flying for the soloists.

Tomorrows forecast looks promising, so we will take to the skies and try our luck once more fellow aviators.

Kind regards.

Damien.

Saturday 17th August. “A day at the Park, Streets ahead of a day spent anywhere else 😉” (Updated version).

(Good afternoon fellow aviators, I have updated Saturdays blog with a motor glider flight made by John H. I didn’t hear about this flight until Sunday morning, but it was well worth a mention in the blog, so I have included it below).

Good evening fellow aviators.

RASP predicted workable local lift at the Park today and Mother Nature didn’t disappoint.

Soaring got off to a slow start in the morning, but from lunch time onwards long workable energy lines of cloud streets started to appear at the Park.

A 10- 15 knot westerly wind made progress a challenge at times, but many sustained soaring flights were enjoyed during the day.

After the Motor Gliders 50 hour inspection was completed, John H ran it down to view the team setting up next weeks Steam Rally at Blandford. On the return leg he noticed a large cloud street south of Gillingham. He switched off the engine & glid out getting to 1500 amsl before hitting a bit of lift. This took him to the edge of the Yeovilton MATZ in a gentle climb to 2000ft. Starting to feel the effects of a bit of jet lag from his and Julies recent transatlantic adventure, he turned for home. About 5 miles west of Wincanton John took a 5knot climb to 3900ft, then glided all the way home. 35 mins engine time, 40 mins noise free.

Later in the afternoon, Mike T managed to ride a convergence to Castle Cary and back in the motor glider. I tried valiantly to ride the same convergence in the Astir, but was a little too low to make the most of that one.

Weather conditions through the day were very pleasant. The westerly wind was very slightly warm, and very refreshing. Bright sunshine most of the time too, reminding me how rejuvenating just helping out on the airfield between flights at the Park can be. The perfect tonic after a weeks work.

A total of 27 Glider flights, and 2 Motor Glider flights today.

Not the strongest of soaring days at the Park, but still ‘streets’ ahead of a day spent almost anywhere else 😉 .

Wednesday 17th July. Great local soaring day 🙂.

Good evening dear aviators. RASP predicted some excellent local soaring at the Park today and Mother Nature delivered.

A usefully high cloud base of around 3500ft above the Park, gave good opportunities to travel between thermal sources through the day.

Carefully following the energy lines as they developed throughout the day, regularly resulted in sustained lift of between 1 & 4 knots up in level flight.

Greg successfully completed his first 2 hour duration flight, clocking up a very respectable 2:41. He was duly rewarded with a high five from Chris  🙂. Well done Greg 👍.

17 flights in total at the Park today. 14 Glider Flights and 3 Motor Glider Flights.

All in all, another very pleasant and productive day at the Park. Plentiful local soaring opportunities, and plentiful training opportunities.

P.S. I was treated today to the tantalising sight of a mysterious crop circle in a field over toward the A303 Services, South East of the Park. I didn’t mange to take a picture this time round, but take a look next  time your flying over that way. Did we have aviators visiting from even further afield than we imagined during last weeks flying week 🛸 👽 . The truth is out there dear aviators 😉.

kind regards.

Damien.

Sunday 09/06/19 at the Park. “A short story about a memorable flight”.

Good evening fellow aviators.

As an addition to our blogs usual flying updates, I thought I would share you with you a short story about a memorable flight I enjoyed on Sunday.

It was mid afternoon on a day that had seen some good soaring between rain showers. Chris Basham was on Winch duty, and duly bashing the winch throttle, launched me and the club Astir LPM to a respectable 1350 ft.

There were many cumulus clouds of potential in sight, but I feared the cloud cover may be too dense and overdeveloped, so I headed tentatively South West into wind to try my luck.

The vario was reading 2 knots down as I approached a large black cloud. A few minutes had past with no signs of workable lift, so I decided this was the last cloud I would try, and if it didn’t work I was heading home. I ventured beneath, and not wanting to stray too much farther from the Park, I tracked gently to the left and then right, feeling the pressure beneath the wings and waiting for any signs of lift. 1.5 knots up, and the vario chirped into life, aha fellow aviators this flight may not be over yet 🙂 .

Straightening and turning, I began to centre in the thermal. 1.5 knots up, became 2 knots up, then 4, finally peaking at 6 knots up just before reaching cloud base. The lift just below cloud base was plentiful, LPM staying aloft with ease in the bountiful thermic conditions. I adjusted my course to keep out of lower cloud areas that appeared to be caused by a convergence, relaxed into my seat and enjoyed having the sky to myself for a while.

In the distance to the North however was a rather foreboding, purple tinged, black cloud towering above all the other cumulus. To the North East a rain curtain drew its veil across the horizon. Hmm, I’m quite high, and that rain looks quite close, better keep an eye it.

I continued to turn and soar and meander beneath my generous cloud companion, and as the minutes flowed gently by I kept a watchful eye on the weather to the North. The towering Wizard of Oz like black cloud to the North appeared to hold station, although still a little close for comfort, the rain curtain to the North East however definitely looked to be moving slowly my way. Ok, I really don’t want to leave this abundance of lift, but I also don’t want to be this high up in rain. Time to head back.

With an abundance of height to lose, I eased out 1/4 airbrake. 2 Knots up on the vario, was the response from my trusty steed. Ok, lets try 1/2 airbrake. 1 knot down, good, were finally heading in the right direction. Lowering the nose a few more degrees and holding the airbrake 1/2 open, I made my way to High Key.

As I began my left hand circuit, the weather to the North still looked threatening, so I was heartened that my decision to give up all that height and lift was a good one. Down Wind leg and a few bubbles of 2 knots up were felt gently rippling through the airframe. Landing area clear, RP in sight, all looking good, trimming out ready for the diagonal leg.

I’m down to 600ft by Low key, a comfortable height as were landing over the trees today at the East end of the strip. Turning onto the diagonal leg, the vario sings into life, 10 knots up, and its sustained lift not a bubble! Hmm, that was unexpected but surely it wont last, right? Final turn, 750ft! Hmm, I’m probably well lined up if I want to land at Stourhead 😉 . I ease out 1/2 airbrake and check my RP. Nope, that wont cut it. 3/4 airbrake, looking better, but I like more of a margin than that. I take full airbrake, and lower the nose a few more degrees. Bingo, were back in the slot dear aviators, the ground wafting toward me like a welcoming warm summers breeze. Round-out, float, touch down! Rolling to a halt, half way down the strip, 1 and a 1/2 wing lengths from the edge of the field, both wings parallel, textbook landing 😎 .

I open the canopy and clamber out the Glider. Calm, clement weather greets me. There are clouds visible to the North, but at ground level, nothing that would give me cause for concern. Oh no dear aviators, have I been a fool, have I just given away sublime effortless lift for no reason! 😟 .

Chris Chappell roars toward me in a Gator in her usual full throttle style, flashes me her usual full throttle smile, “what happened Damien, you must of hit terrific sink, you looked well away”. “No”,  I sheepishly reply, “I thought the rain was coming, so headed home”.

Head bowed, I hold the wing and start back for the hangar, its time to pack up, so no time to revisit my haven of soaring this day. I can feel the cheeks on my face still flushed hot with the thrill and delight of the flight, but I cant shake my dismay that I may have just thrown away something special 🙁 .

We park LPM on the grass, and go to help put the K6 away. Holding one end of the tail strop, we enter the cool shade of the hangar. My ears prick, is that a few taps of rain I hear on the corrugated hangar roof? The taps build in intensity and within seconds the heavens have opened. As the rain falls my heart sings. Yesss dear aviators!! I did make the right choice 😃😃 . I had ventured into the wild once more, enjoyed the thrills of soaring with mother nature herself, brought pilot and plane home in one piece, and given myself a 15 minute safety margin ahead of the coming rain!! What a tremendous flight dear aviators 🙂🙂 .

Recounting with delight the story of my adventure to anyone that would listen, I received two excellent pieces of advice for countering excessive lift experienced while in the circuit. The first was from Mike Jenks, “if that happens again, open your airbrake to counter the lift as its happening, don’t throw away all the extra height gained, better to be a bit too high, than a bit too low”. The second was from Nick Bowers, “right then, its time Damien for you to learn the art of Side Slipping”.

What a day dear aviators. Next job on my ‘to-do’ list, learn the art of Side Slipping 🙂 .

kind regards.

Damien.

Friday 24th May. The end of another great ‘Flying Week’ at the Park 🙂

We were treated to another great ‘Flying Week’ at the Park this week fellow aviators 🙂 .

I think you’re right Mike, everyone was so busy making the most of the great flying weather, our beloved blog was left unattended too.

I flew everyday this week apart from Monday, and the soaring opportunities were plentiful.

As a relative newcomer to the sport, I took on board a very handy tip from Mike Thorne and pushed my own limits this week, by setting myself local soaring tasks. I used turn points at Longleat, Stourhead, and a Farm South East of the Park (clear of the circuit). I then tried to fly round this short local circuit quicker and quicker each time.

The Cross Country Pilots have the Ladder. Perhaps my fellow relative newcomers to the sport, could have our own local soaring, “Step Ladder” league table 🙂 . Good practice in readiness for our own future Cross Country endeavours.

I had a fantastic weeks flying. It is my Birthday today, and I even spent that at the Park flying with my fellow aviators, I can’t think of a better way I could have spent it.

As it is my Birthday today, I did of course bring a selection of cakes with me to the Park (picture below).

I think there are some sticky toffee cakes left. If they haven’t yet been devoured by a hungry aviator, they can be found in the caravan, any early birds at the Park tomorrow, feel free to help yourselves 🙂 .

Kind regards.

Damien.

Tuesday 21st May at the Park.

What a great day dear aviators 🙂 .

RASP promised good things (screen shot below), and Mother Nature delivered.

Glorious sunshine and the promise of plentiful soaring opportunities saw a full launch point of pilots, many of whom had Cross Country ambitions for the day. I’m sure Alastair will update soon on the days Cross Country achievements.

On a personal note, as a relative newcomer to the sport, today I flew the club K6 and achieved my 2 hour duration which will form part of my Cross Country endorsement, and also gained my Silver height (picture below) 🙂 .

Another glorious day at the Park dear aviators, with a full summer ahead to look forward too 🙂 .

Kind regards.

Damien.

The Park Saturday 4th May. Windy and Wild.

Good evening fellow Aviators.

RASP predicted great potential for Saturdays flying at the Park, but the soaring opportunities arrived with strong gusting winds to add a little extra excitement to the days proceedings, (see screen shots below).

Severe gusting cross winds delayed progress in the morning, and a change in wind direction required a change of ends at the Park. As the morning drew on the gusting wind component eased, and club members were treated to some very strong thermal activity, with members regularly sustaining climb rates of 4 – 10 knots up to cloud base at 5000 – 5500 ft.

The gusting winds didn’t ease of completely however, and provided excellent cross wind training for students.

Club members were treated to an aerobatic master class from John Hull in one of our club Puchacz, including Loops, Stall Turns, 3G turns, a Quarter Clover, and final ‘bow to the crowd’ Hammer Head Stall.

Chris Chappell had seen it all before (picture below)

Dan Weston had a valiant attempt at his 100k, but after encountering an impassable stretch of blue sky with a 6 knots down component, he was forced to land out at Beckhampton. A safe and well executed field landing ensued, and Dan waited in the conveniently located local pub for his retrieval. Many thanks to Jorn Schuster for leading Dan’s retrieval, particularly as Jorn wasn’t even at the Park on Saturday and agreed to be on standby at home for Dan’s retrieval.

Pictures of Dan’s well executed field landing below.

All in all, another excellent days flying at the Park, with the club achieving 15 Winch Launches, and 1 Aero Tow.

Kind regards.

Damien.

Blog bereft aviator.

What has happened to our beloved Blog dear aviators.

There have been so many recent Blog worthy events since it was last published. We enjoyed a glorious Bank Holiday weekend, a Flying Week of soaring highs and lows, and today another Sunday of noteworthy aviation. All have come and gone with not so much of a hint of BWND Blog recognition.

In the past ten days, our club members have reported experiencing 6 knots up of lift on occasion, and I’ve heard of at least three successful flights in Wave.

Grace our computer screens once more dear Blog, you have been greatly missed.

kind regards.

Damien.

Wednesday 13th February, Flying Report.

Good evening fellow aviators.

The car park at the club was full today. The weather appears to be improving every week now, and it was terrific to see so many members turn out to make the most of today’s flying opportunities.

26 Winch Launches, and 2 Aero Tows were achieved, including some Full Cat training, BI training, and Annual Checks.

The ridge was working well for part of the day, with one lucky pilot achieving a flight time of 1:07 in a club Astir, and another pilot managing to stay aloft for 0:39 in the club K6.

The workshop team worked busily all day as usual, completing maintenance tasks on club Gliders, and also assisting fellow club members with airworthiness checks on their own aircraft.

A very productive and enjoyable day all round.

Our ubiquitous club cameraman Chris Basham, was on hand to capture some moments from the day. For your viewing pleasure dear aviators, a selection of Chris’s pictures can be enjoyed below.

Thanks.

Kind regards.

Damien.

A full car park at the Club today. Terrific to see so many members turn out to make the most of today’s flying opportunities.
The club Astir and K6, enjoyed some good ridge flying during the day.
The launch point was kept busy all day, with the days final flight landing shortly before sunset.
Chris and Sue had far too much fun, as usual! 🙂

Flying Report Sunday 10th February. “Fortune favoured the brave”.

Today resulted in some great flying.

It wasn’t a promising start to the day from a weather perspective. It was raining in the early part of the morning, and bitterly cold, with a windchill that would have given a polar bear “paws” for thought, 🙂 .

However, the spirits of the skeleton crew of hardy aviators was not dampened. The weather improved as the morning rolled on and we took to the skies. Rain paused play briefly, conveniently enough it was at lunch time, and flying resumed again shortly after.

We managed 7 Aero Tow flights throughout the day. Cloud Street formations developed around the Park in the afternoon, resulting in 2 of todays flights having a thermal gain of 500 ft each after releasing from the tug.

I uploaded some pictures of the day to share with you all, please see below.

Kind regards.

Damien.

Todays wind chill was bitterly cold, but nothing could dampen the enthusiasm of the team to get flying.

No caravan comfort for this hardy band of aviation enthusiasts, just a landy and a gator.

Some stunning views were enjoyed of the skies and countryside around the Park.

As the afternoon rolled on we were treated to some Cloud Street formations, resulting in some great flying for those lucky enough to be in the sky at the right times.

The newly installed S80 indicated some respectable climb rates beneath the Cloud Streets.

The path to be taken is clear dear aviators.

Good evening fellow aviators.

I visited the Park this afternoon to check on conditions there, and you will be delighted to know, that all is now largely clear of snow.

Most of the snow has melted away, and the early signs of spring can be seen trying to burst their way through to greet us.

The B3095 main road across the Deverill’s is clear, but still has some snow lining the road sides and verges, so must be approached at a cautionary speed.

The farm track up to Park is clear, and the main body of the airfield is also clear. The ground is of course still very wet, with a heavy mist hanging in the air whilst I was there, with some occasional light rain also, to moisten matters more.

For your viewing pleasure, some pictures from my visit below to share with you all.

Kind regards.

Damien.

The path to be taken is clear dear aviators. The track to the Park now almost completely clear of snow, and very easy to drive up.

A little snow remains at the top of the track, at the Park entrance. But it’s very easy to drive over.

The farmers crop has returned to full colour, cheerily shrugging off its snowy adventure.

Indeed, the whole of the countryside around the Park appears to have bounced back vibrantly.

The main body of the airfield looks in great shape. But is of course still very wet.

Where once a mighty 3ft snowdrift once nobly stood, only a light dusting of snow remains to remind us of cooler times.

The Club Hangar, the beating heart of our aerial ambitions, completely clear of snow. Free once more from natures wintry embrace.

I don’t know about you dear reader, but I’m starting to feel Springs eager approach.

Anonymous aerial visitor (addendum).

Fantastic Aerial photographs from yesterday.

The fourth image is my favourite, what a view!

I also wonder Mike, who is our anonymous in house artist?

Could it be Banksy?

No Mike, it was Chris Teasdale. You can see his name on the RSS feed, please pay attention dear fellow. A little too much Tenerife sun perhaps, for our esteemed former Chairman.

Thanks.

Kind regards.

Damien.

The Park gleamed in todays winter sun.

Good evening fellow aviators.

I simply couldn’t resist the temptation to visit the Park today, and experience its snow covered splendour.

The park is still inaccessible by car, but is of course perfectly accessible by the intrepid adventurer who enjoys a good walk.

I took some photos of my visit to share with you all.

Hope you enjoy them.

Kind regards.

Damien.

The track leading to the park, is passable by only the most capable of 4×4’s.

The track up to the park feels much steeper on foot than it does in the car!

The view from the top of the track, was well worth the effort made walking up it.

The photograph below is of a snowdrift. On this short section of the track the snow has built up to 3ft deep! Thats the club hangar you can see in the distance, it’s well clear of the snowdrift fortunately. 

The club house / hangar was surprisingly clear of snow. The snow around the building perimeter only a few inches deep.

The airfield was literally gleaming in the winter sun, and was breathtaking to see. It felt more like a mountain plateau than an airfield. 

Still Snowing in Mere – B3095 Road Closed due to Snow.

Good afternoon fellow aviators.

Mere is resplendent in a thick blanket of crisp white snow. Mere is approximately 3 miles South West of the Park. It has snowed here all day, and is still snowing as I type this blog update.

The B3095 Road used to access to the Park is closed due to the snow. I spoke to a highways officer at the Mere entrance to the B3095  at 16:30 today, and he confirmed the snow was  up to six feet deep in some places, due to high winds blowing snow across the fields, and much of this snow then building up between the hedge rows and fences that line the B3095.

A snow plough is en-route, and the road is expected to be clear by the morning. However with low forecast temperature tonight and tomorrow, driving conditions in this area are likely to be challenging.

Wonderful weather for bracing walks, and building snowmen, but not weather best suited for travel.

Picture below is St Michaels Church in Mere, I took it this afternoon while enjoying a very pleasant amble in the snow. Hope you all managed to keep warm and comfortable today, and also made the most of the days seasonal snowy treat.

Kind regards.

Damien.